Mera Peak Climbing - 19 Days

Overview

Best time to climb Mera Peak: 
We recommend climbing Mera Peak in late April, May, late September, October, and November. We find that when we climb on Mera Peak, generally the best months are May and October. If you decide to climb in late March, early April, or late October into November, you need to be ready for colder conditions. The extreme altitude does mean that no matter how fit you are, climbing Mera Peak will be a tough challenge. On this part of the trek, you will see local villages farming the terraces as they have done for generations.

If you have already done a high-altitude trek and coped well, then Mera is the perfect next adventure. At this altitude, the oxygen content of air is less than half of what it is at sea level – for this reason, we would not recommend you take on Mera as your first high-altitude trek. Mera Peak is 6476m and is the highest trekking peak in Nepal. You need to understand how your body acclimatises to the altitude before taking on a climb like Mera Peak. The challenge is very much about stamina and endurance though, as no technical skills are needed to complete the climb. We think it is definitely worth the effort! The expedition starts with a beautiful approach up the Arun Valley which takes you away from all the crowds on the Everest trek.
 
 
 
for more information please visit our FAQs thank you.

“Itinerary”

Day 1
Arrival day in Kathmandu (1,300m/4,264 ft).

Welcome to Nepal. After you have landed at the Tribhuvan Intl. Airport, (TIA), a Himalayan Memories Trek representative welcomes you with your name and assists to transfer you to your hotel in Kathmandu. After time to get refreshed, we bring you to the HMT headquarters and brief you about the program. In the evening, we’ll pick up you for a welcome dinner in one of the typical Nepalese restaurants with a cultural program in the heart of Kathmandu and then you will overnight back at your hotel.

Day 2
Preparation day for your trip.

You can take a world heritage sightseeing tour inside Kathmandu to Boudhanath Stupa / Swayambhunath / Pashupatinath. You will be overnight in your Kathmandu hotel.

Day 3
Fly to Lukla (2,800m/9,186ft) & trek to Chutanga (3,450m/11,320ft).

This morning, you’ll be transferred to a domestic airport and fly to Lukla. It takes 40 minutes scenic flight up to a small airstrip to Tenzing Hillary airport to Lukla and you experience your first breakfast in the mountains whilst our team organise porters, and while the guide sorts and divides the load baggage to be carried by porters. We start our trek further on an easy day through the woodland above Lukla. Our team will lead through the pasture to the edge of a diminishing forest of rhododendron and pine which clothes the steep hillsides above Lukla. We make steady progress, crossing ridges and streams up to ‘kharka’ used for grazing yaks where we’ll stop for 2 overnight at camp at Chutanga.

Day 4
Acclimatization day at Chutanga.

This morning after a Himalayan breakfast at the camp we’ll have full day leisure at camp or spend a day walking up to a small grassy peak below the Zatra Teng Pass, reaching an altitude of (4,000m/13,120ft). There are excellent views out over the valley of the Dudh (milk) Kosi (river), and also views of our route towards the Zatrwa La. We stroll back to our camp at Chutanga for the overnight.

Day 5
Trek to Tuli Kharka (4,250m/13,944ft).

After a rest/acclimatisation day at Chutanga, we continue a long day walk around 6-7 hours crossing the Kalo Himal Ridge that separates the Khumbu from the Hinku valley that leads across this ridge is the Zatrwa La, traversing to the right and finally descending steeply to Tuli Kharka (big pasture) where there are several basic lodges. We make camp beside the lodges. Remainder time rest and relax at the camp after a long walk.

Day 6
Trek to Gothey (3600m/11,812ft).

Today, after breakfast we continue our journey descending to Hinku valley of Gothey. This is a good place to camp and there are several teahouses around and you can visit and go and watch the local lifestyle in the remaining time and we’ll camp nearby the tea shops and overnight.

Day 7
Trek to ThagNak (4,350m/14,272ft).

The following day is another short day as you trek in the shadow of Mera Himal along the ridge of the Hinku Khola. On the west bank of the Hinku Drangka northwards, we will take lunch at Gondishung, a summer herders’ settlement. Beyond Gondishung, we pass a 200-year-old Gompa built beneath a massive boulder, to burn some juniper at the shrine, an offering that just might ensure a successful ascent of Mera Peak. ThagNak is a summer grazing area with the simplest of lodges and shops starting to develop and we overnight in ThagNak.

Day 8
Acclimatization day in ThagNak.

Another acclimatization day is essential here. It is in a superb setting surrounded by stunning peaks. There is a huge moraine in the north of Tangang where a beautiful glacial lake, Sabal Tsho is dammed which is definitely worth a visit. A cairn (5,270m/17,290ft) on the flanks of Kusum Kanguru can also be rewarding and beneficial for acclimatization. Our climbing Sherpa provide you training course.

Day 9
Trek to Khare (5,025m/16,486ft).

Today, we are heading up from TangNak towards the Mera Base camp at Khare. We follow the lateral moraine of Dig Glacier to Dig Kharka, which offers spectacular views of Charpate Himal. We will climb through moraines and to the snout of the Hinku Nup and Shar Glaciers and then climb more steeply to your camping spot at Khare after 3-4 hrs walk.

Day 10
Ice climbing practice near Khare.

This morning after breakfast, we prepare our gear for ice climbing (This may depend on season and availability of Ice; if ice not available, then we just hike around or rest) – just above the Khare and need to walk a couple of hrs from where there are good views of the Mera La and the route up the mountain. This will also be a time for practising a few hrs Ice climbing and our leader will teach you and instruct you about the climbing. After a few hrs practising at the glacier, stroll back to camp and final preparation of our equipment and packing of our mountain bags and overnight.

Day 11
Trek to Mera base camp (5,350m/17,552ft).

This is going to be a very short trek, allowing for as much acclimatization time and a day walk as you make your way to Mera Base Camp. We first climb to the crest of the moraine above Khare and then up a steep slope of scree or snow to reach a boulder-strewn bowl below the lower tongue of the Mera Glacier. Reaching the pass Mera La (5,415m/17,766ft) allows us to see spectacular views; we then descend 100m (328ft) towards the Hongu side and set up base camp in the moraine below the ice and we overnight in Mera Base Camp.

Day 12
Climb to Mera high camp (5,750m/18,865ft).

Making your way to Mera High Camp can be hazardous if it has recently snowed, as there are a number of crevasses here. You make your way to the top of the rock band, which is marked by a large cairn. You set up a high camp and from here the views are outstanding, with Everest, Makalu, Cho Oyu, and more piercing the skyline. This evening, we overnight in Mera High Camp.

Day 13
Summit Mera and descend to Khare.

This is a big day, we wake up at 2.30 am around and after breakfast, the group will put on crampons and rope up before setting out for the summit. From the high camp, a well-acclimatized party will take 3 – 4 hours to the central summit of Mera peak. If time and conditions permit we may opt to make the traverse to the slightly higher north summit. This excursion adds 2 -3 hours to the day is of a more technical nature than the rest of the climb and the decision as to whether we attempt this will be taken by the trip leader. From the summit can be seen the magnificent views of Mt. Everest (8,848m/29,029ft), Cho-Oyu (8,201m/26,906ft), Lhotse (8,516m/27,940ft), Makalu(8,463m/27,766ft), Kangchenjunga (8,586m/28,169ft), Nuptse (7,855m/25,770ft), Lobuche (6,145m/20,160ft), Chamlang (7,319m/24,013ft) are spectacular from the summit. You then retrace your steps to Khare after the climb with a rest and some hot soup at high camp on the way down. A long but inspirational day!

Day 14
Reserve day for Bad weather condition.

This day we must keep for the reserve day for the unforeseen condition as weather problem or weakness then you can take this day as your reserve day and if earlier back then you can take the rest somewhere else around. If already climb this day you can use it for another Ice climbing day or spend one more night in the village of Lukla. (Breakfast,

Day 15
Return back to Kothe.

After a great success of the expedition to Mt. Mera, we descend to Hinku valley to Kothye for our overnight stop at camp. Enjoy the evening with local wines or whatever you want to relax at the camp and overnight.

Day 16
Trek to Tuli Kharka.

Today, we again climb up through the lush forest on the west side of the Hinku Valley to Tuli Kharka below the Zatwra La where we’ll stay overnight at camp.

Day 17
Trek back to Lukla via crossing Chhatra-La.

Today, we have the last day for the trek and we start to climb a few hundred meters to the Zatrwa La top will be our last climb of the trip. After the top, we descending up to Lukla village where we conclude the trekking part and this evening enjoy with crews at the last dinner at the mountain and overnight at the teahouse.

Day 18
Fly back to Kathmand.

The flight times to Kathmandu are schedule for early morning normally, because of the wind in the afternoon, sometimes the flight time can be delayed due to bad weather and other reason beyond our command. Anyway, we will fly back to Kathmandu and your guide will transfer you to the hotel. You may have time to relax after a long journey and take back your breath and rest at your hotel.

Day 19
Airport transfer for Final Departure.

It’s your last day in Nepal! Grab some breakfast, and then take in some last-minute shopping in Kathmandu. We’ll make sure you arrive at Kathmandu International Airport with plenty of time before your flight home. At this time, we’ll say our goodbyes and bid you farewell, armed with warm memories and gorgeous photos to show your loved ones.

“Includes”

  • 1. ARRIVALS AND TRANSFER TO HOTEL BY THE TOURIST BUS OR PRIVATE VEHICLES.
  • 2. 3 NIGHT ACCOMMODATION IN 3 STAR CATEGORISED HOTEL IN KATHMANDU.
  • 3. HIMALAYAN MEMORIES TREK /DUFFEL BAG, T SHIRT, AND TREKKING MAP.
  • 4. WELCOME DINNER WITH NEPAL CULTURAL SHOW.
  • 5. ONE DAY KATHMANDU CITY SIGHT SCENE.
  • 6. GOVERNMENT LICENCE HOLDER TREKKING GUIDE
  • 7. ALL MEAL BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, AND TEA, COFFEE,
  • 8. ALL STAFF EXPENSES
  • 9. ALL STAFFS MEDICAL AND EMERGENCY RESCUE INSURANCES DURING THE TRIP.
  • 10. ALL STAFF FOODS.
  • 11. PORTER WAGES.
  • 12. GUIDE WAGES.
  • 13. PORTER EQUIPMENT.
  • 14. KITCHEN UTENSILS.
  • 15. NATIONAL PARK ENTRY FEE.
  • 16. MUNICIPALITY CHARGE.
  • 17. ALL GOVERNMENT TAXES.
  • 18. CLIMBING PERMIT

Cost Excludes

  • * 1. LUNCH AND DINNER IN KATHMANDU EXCEPT WELCOME AND FAREWELL DINNER.
  • * 2. INTERNATIONAL AIRFARE.
  • * 3. TRAVEL AND EMERGENCY RESCUE INSURANCE.
  • * 4. NEPAL VISA FEE.
  • * 5. ALCOHOLIC STUFFS.
  • * 6. FILMING PERMIT OF DRONE AND CAMERA.
  • * 7. EXTRA NIGHT ACCOMMODATION IN KATHMANDU IF LATE DEPARTURE.
  • * 8. PERSONAL EXPENSES, LAUNDRY, WIFI CHARGE, SO ON.
  • * 9. STAFF TIPS. (MINIMUM OF 5% OF YOUR TOTAL TRIP COST)

MORE INFORMATION

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Daily Activities

On your trek, every morning, you are awoken early by a Himalayan Memories Trek staff with a first cup of native tea or coffee, along with a bowl of warm water to freshen up. Next, you are served a full breakfast of local fare. Such as fresh fruit and vegetables where it is available. We mainly serve freshly made porridge, eggs, camp made breads etc.

While you have breakfast the Sherpa’s use this time to disassemble the tents, so make sure you pack all bags before sitting for breakfast. while some porters set off on the daily walk in order to make setups in advance of our arrival at the next stop/camp, so that when we get there, all you have to do is relax and enjoy the area.

Typically, our walks start soon after breakfast. After a couple of hours walk, we will stop for lunches. In general, the afternoon walk is shorter than the morning one, to give people time to visit neighbouring villages, to rest and to chat while the chefs prepare the supper.

Acclimatisation

Our treks allow a good time to acclimatise and as a mountain guiding outfit we always want to ensure the trek is safe. Reducing the number of days may make the price cheaper but the chances of safely reaching base camp also greatly reduce. We follow established mountaineering principles of height gain on all treks to altitude.

Training

AT YOUR HOME, BEFORE LEAVING TO JOIN TEAM HIMALAYAN MEMORIES TREK FOR HIMALAYAN ADVENTURES: WE RECOMMEND THE FOLLOWING:

1. CRAMPON ON LADDER PRACTICE:
* You will need:
(a)aluminium house ladder,any length, longer the better.
(b) crampons that you will use in the mountains.
(c)climbing boots that you will use in the mountains.

Put on your crampons on your boots, grab your ladder and place it in the yard and PRACTICE walking back and forth on the ladder rungs.
Do the following:

1. One way walk over and step off ladder, turn and repeat.

2. turnarounds ON the ladder (rarely needed, but you never know and contingency preparation is always a good thing.

3. walk halfway or more over ladder, stop and reverse yourself back to where you started and step off. Repeat.

It is super important to have practice and feel confident on metal/aluminium ladders it may be placed on the routes on any mountains.

Insurance

As soon as you book your trip with Himalayan Memories Trek you should purchase a policy which covers trekking upto 5500m this will cover you any unexpected events force you to cancel. Your policy should also cover helicopter rescue in the event of an emergency evacuation.The only two methods of travel mostly are on foot or by helicopter once in the mountains. Obviously certain medical conditions are either so debilitating or urgent that the first option is not practicable as an evacuation method. Helicopter evacuation is very expensive and is also dependent on favourable weather conditions. Many of the helicopters are working at the limit of their operating altitude in the higher parts of the valley. Himalayan memories trek will be well placed to coordinate an efficient rescue but we must stress that there is no single definitive cost for a helicopter rescue, much depends on what else the pilot is doing in the area, how far the helicopter has to fly, where it started from and so on. The maximum is about $10,000 from Everest base camp (for example) Itself, so your travel insurance should cover up to this figure specifically for rescue costs. The helicopter company will require a payment guarantee before they fly, this will be done by your insurance provider, opening a case number and arranging the relevant exchanges of information and certification. For this purpose, it is essential that you have the right policy and provide us with all the policy details. Our staff have got mobile phones and generally, there is somewhere near with a phone signal, or else one of the staff will go to the nearest place. The safety and stability of the injured person is the job of the group and the staff and anyone nearby who can assist because sometimes it can take hours for a helicopter to arrive. Thankfully many of the trails have first aid posts along the way, but every group should be prepared to help deal with an injured person and in this case, it goes without saying that the needs of that person are more important than the trek itinerary.
It will be a matter of the helicopter company ascertaining that it is safe to fly to the relevant location and then flying the casualty to a nominated location, almost certainly a hospital in Kathmandu. The helicopter will then be met by Himalayan Memories trek who will help to coordinate any further stages in the process. The helicopter will also fly into Kathmandu airport and our staff will arrange for a car or ambulance to take the person to the hospital. If for any reason the helicopter is unable to fly we will use our many local staff and contacts to coordinate an alternative rescue and treatment regime. Normally this means using horses or simply stretchering a person off the mountain to the nearest safe place or safe helicopter landing area. Again, this is something that will generally involve everyone.

7 rules in the Himalayas

1) Go slowly and take a full day for the hike rather than get there as fast as possible.

2) Drink lots of liquid.

3) Always give way to yaks right of way and when you meet one on a path with a drop to one side, always stand on the uphill side.

4) Don’t get caught out with inadequate clothing to cope with a rapid change in weather This is the high Himalaya and a clear bright morning does not mean the same in the afternoon.

5) Do not wander off by yourself and always make sure people know where you are. Anything can happen and a slip on scree or moraine can mean getting cold very quickly while waiting for someone to come and help.

6) Part of the trek is on lateral moraine and some places are slippery. There is no need for crampons but simple care where you are walking is important.

7) Remember that the best approach to safety is to prevent an accident happening in the first place.

Equipment

“Himalayan Memories Trek advisory equipment list”

(Feet)
Alpine boots for climbing
Casual Shoes
Crampons 12 point
Socks – thick woollen ones and hiking

(Head)
Neoprene face-mask
Balaclava or buffs
White sunhat with neck cover
Sunglasses with 100% UV lens
Woolly hats
Climbing helmet

(Hands)
Wind-stopper gloves and fleece gloves,
Down mitts-lightweight
Liner gloves

(Skin)
SPF40 Sunscreen
Dermatone high altitude sun-cream

SPF25 lip-cream
Moisturising cream

Base Layer
Thermals tops and bottoms, thin and thick

(Mid layer)
Fleece bottoms
Fleece tops
light down jacket
Hiking clothes

(Outer layer)
Down jacket – heavy duty
Windproof trousers and jacket,

(Climbing)
Ice Axe
Harness
‘Cows tail’ with jumar and safety karabiner
Descender (figure of 8 easiest)
Spares Bags
90 litre rucksack
45 litre day-sack
Large duffel bag
Many stuff sacks and dry bags

(Camping)
4 Season down/synthetic sleeping bag
1 litre metal flasks
water bottles with insulating cover
Rucksack cover
Head-torch with batteries, high quality (and spare head-torch)
Walking poles
Sleeping mat
Thermos food flask
Thermal mug
Titanium spork
Towel
Box of repair kits(Leather-man)
Pee bottle
Alarm clock

Baggage Allowance

Your main item of luggage should be a sturdy kit bag, duffel bag or similar. This will be carried during the trek by porters or pack animals and must weigh no more than 15kg. You should also bring on your holiday a day-pack of approximately 30 litres capacity. It is possible to leave items not required on trek at the hotel in Kathmandu. For your international flights, please check the baggage allowance with your airline.

First Aid Kit

(Personal first aid kit contents)

Paracetamol
Ibuprofen
Antiseptic Wipes
Adhesive Plasters
Blister Plasters
Zinc Tape
Insect Repellent
Antihistamine tablets
Sunblock Cream
Water Purification Tablets
Crepe Bandage
Hydrocortisone Cream

Spending Money

Approximately $350 (or equivalent in pound Sterling, Euros) changed into local currency, should be allowed for miscellaneous expenses including porter and trek crew tips, drinks etc. It is not necessary to obtain local currency prior to departure. Pound Sterling, US Dollars and Euros are equally acceptable for exchange in Nepal. We recommend that you carry your travel money in the form of cash, since you will exchange the majority of this on the day of your arrival in Kathmandu. If you prefer not to carry all of your spending money in cash, it is possible to withdraw money from ATM’s in Kathmandu using your debit or credit cards. (Fee applies) During the trek it is possible to buy snacks, chocolate, soft drinks and beer on most days. Please be aware that since everything has to be carried up by porters or animals, these items become more expensive as you gain altitude.

Staff Tipping

Tipping is the accepted way of saying thank you for good service. Normally the porters and any other trek staff are given their tips at the end of the trek and this is best done as a group. Your Guide will advise the group on an appropriate level of tipping. Most groups will hand out the tips with a bit of ceremony (or sometimes a party) on the last evening, to mark the end of the holiday. we recommend that each group member contributes around 5 to 10% of your total trip cost to these tips. At the end of their trek many people also like to donate various items of equipment to the porters and trek staff who work so hard to make the trip a success. Boots, gloves, hats, scarves and even socks are always warmly received by the porters. Your guide will make arrangements for a fair distribution (possibly by raffle) amongst the trek crew. Please note that you will have the opportunity to tip your guide separately during dinner on the final evening of the holiday. If you felt your guide was especially helpful, please consider an appropriate bonus to him or her of 20% of group tips.

Value of Money

Our prices are competitive and good value, and we offer quality, service, security and an ethical stance on tourism in a developing country. We don’t want to be so expensive to run fewer trips and have our staff idle, but on the other hand we believe that running cheap trips that promote the practice of skimming budgets would result in the porters getting next to nothing, which is something we cannot consider. Your porters work extremely hard to carry your gear, advance set ups and keep your journey safe and enjoyable, sometimes at their own risk and peril. We could not complete our journey without them. They have families, too, and we all want to have an enjoyable, rewarding expedition full of great memories! Tashi Delek!

You can send your enquiry via the form below.

Mera Peak Climbing

Trip Facts

  • flight & private transport
  • 2 to 16
  • 4-5
  • MAR|APR|MAY|SEP|OCT|NOV
  • Fully Experience Guided
  • breakfast/lunch/diner
  • Trekking & Climbing
  • 6476m Mera Summit
  • Best available
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